American Boricua in Memphis

AlvisWandaWeb
I recently had the incredible fortune to meet mi gente in and around Memphis, Tennessee. Meet the amazing American Boricua Alvis Otero, who is doing incredible work with the Latino community. The learn more about the important work of Latino Memphis: www.latinomemphis.org

American Boricua meets DREAMER Dulce Matuz

DREAMER Dulce Matuz

While American Boricua was in the heartland this past summer, a member of the State of Nebraska Latino Commission graciously extended an invitation to hear Dulce Matuz speak in Omaha. Her message is an inspiring one.

Ms. Matuz is one of Time Magazine’s 2012 ‘World’s 100 Most Influential People’ and the President of the Arizona DREAM Act Coalition. This passionate and courageous woman, an electrical engineer, also shared her story with the U.S. congress during efforts to pass the DREAM Act in 2011.

This piece of legislation offers a path to U.S. citizenship for young people under the age of 16 who were brought to the United States as children. The DREAM Act was written specifically for young Latinos who want to attend college or serve in a branch of the United States military, yet lack access to federal scholarships because of their immigration status.

Dulce is an American in the 21st Century.

To learn more about her story:

http://www.cnn.com/2011/US/05/14/education.dulce/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=61qfyZqmbGY

 

American Boricua is ‘Under My Skin’ at The Wing Luke Museum

This audio excerpt is from a recent American Boricua interview in Seattle, Washington.

Ray Cabatit describes his father Ramundo’s migration from San Marcelino, the Philippines,

through San Francisco, California, to the Yakima Valley of Washington. When Josefina Cabatit

landed in the mainland U.S. from Gurabo, Puerto Rico after WWII, her love of Washington

State was instant. Ray and Josefina are featured in ‘Under My Skin’, a new exhibition at The

Wing Luke Museum in Seattle’s International District. ©Wanda Benvenutti

 

To learn more about American Boricua Ray Cabatit, and the history the Philippines and Puerto

Rico share, go to The Under My Skin blog: http://beyondtalk2.wordpress.com/2013/05/09/future-is-now/

 

American Boricua at The Wing Luke Museum • EXHIBIT OPENING RECEPTION: Under My Skin | Thursday, May 9 @ 6-8pm Join us as we celebrate the opening of this exhibition. 6-7pm Special preview for Museum Members and invited guests. Light refreshments will be served. To RSVP, please contact mmartinez@wingluke.org or 206.623.5124 ext 107. 7-8pm Open to the public, free admission, No RSVP required.

American Boricua at The Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience
719 South King Street Seattle, Washington 98104 206.623.5124
• EXHIBIT OPENING RECEPTION: Under My Skin | Thursday, May 9 @ 6-8pm
Join us as we celebrate the opening of this exhibition.
6-7pm Special preview for Museum Members and invited guests.
7-8pm Open to the public, free admission, No RSVP required.

 

 

 

 

 

Más de un siglo de ‘CaliRicans’ (More than a century of ‘CaliRicans’)

Last June I had the pleasure of being interviewed by Antonio Mejías-Rentas, a reporter for the Spanish-language newspaper El Diario.  The Puerto Rican Diaspora in the state of California (as well as the rest of the United States) is indeed more than 100 years old. Gracias Antonio for shedding light on this living history. To read the full story:

American Boricua in El Diario

Here the American Boricua excerpt:

Algunos de estos grupos estarán representados hoy en el Desfile Nacional Puertorriqueño de Nueva York, que este año está dedicado a los llamados “CaliRicans”.

A lo largo de sus ya más de 100 años en California, los puertorriqueños han sabido destacarse en actividades diversas. Fue una pareja formada por una mujer puertorriqueña y un hombre mexicano, Felícitas y Gonzalo Méndez, quienes ganaron un importante caso de segregación racial contra un distrito escolar del Condado de Orange en 1946. Docenas de estrellas boricuas se distinguen en la industria del cine y la televisión de Hollywood, siguiendo los pasos de los ganadores del Oscar Rita Moreno y José Ferrer.

Nacidos en California o emigrados —de la isla, de Nueva York o de otros centros de gran población boricua— los CaliRicans tienen identidad propia.

Eso dice Wanda Benvenutti, una fotoperiodista nacida en la costa este pero establecida en Seattle, Washington, que ha documentado la diáspora boricua en los 50 estados.

“Hay más libertad en Caifornia”, dice Benvenutti, que está por publicar el libro American Boricua de fotografías y relatos. “La actitud abierta del Oeste nos da la posibilidad de ser quienes queremos ser”.